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Denmark happiest nation; UAE tops in GCC

New York, April 9, 2012

Denmark has taken the top spot on the United Nation's first World Happiness Report, followed by Finland, Norway and the Netherlands.

The 158-page report, published by Columbia University's Earth Institute, was commissioned for the United Nations Conference on Happiness in order to "review the state of happiness in the world today and show how the new science of happiness explains personal and national variations in happiness."

In the Gulf region, the UAE topped, taking the 17th position globally. Saudi Arabia came second regionally, while being ranked 26th globally.

The rankings in the report were based on a number called the "life evaluation score," a measurement which takes into account a variety of factors including people's health, family and job security as well as social factors like political freedom and government corruption. It also looks at measurements from previous reports on happiness from the Gallup World Poll (GWP), the World Values Survey (WVS), the European Values Survey (EVS), and the European Social Survey (ESS).

The average life evaluation score of happiest countries was 7.6 on a 0-to-10 scale. The least happy countries are all poor countries in Sub-Saharan Africa (Togo, Benin, Central African Republic, Sierra Leone) with average life evaluation scores of 3.4.

It is not just wealth that makes people happy: Political freedom, strong social networks and an absence of corruption are together more important than income in explaining well-being differences between the top and bottom countries, said the study.

At the individual level, good mental and physical health, someone to count on, job security and stable families are crucial.

The report, published by the Earth Institute and co-edited by the institute’s director, Jeffrey Sachs, reflects a new worldwide demand for more attention to happiness and absence of misery as criteria for government policy. It reviews the state of happiness in the world today and shows how the new science of happiness explains personal and national variations in happiness.

The report shows that, where happiness is measured by how happy people are with their lives:
* Happier countries tend to be richer countries. But more important for happiness than income are social factors like the strength of social support, the absence of corruption and the degree of personal freedom.
*Over time as living standards have risen, happiness has increased in some countries, but not in others (like for example, the United States). On average, the world has become a little happier in the last 30 years (by 0.14 times the standard deviation of happiness around the world).
*Unemployment causes as much unhappiness as bereavement or separation. At work, job security and good relationships do more for job satisfaction than high pay and convenient hours.
*Behaving well makes people happier.
*Mental health is the biggest single factor affecting happiness in any country. Yet only a quarter of mentally ill people get treatment for their condition in advanced countries and fewer in poorer countries.
*Stable family life and enduring marriages are important for the happiness of parents and children.
*In advanced countries, women are happier than men, while the position in poorer countries is mixed.
*Happiness is lowest in middle age.




Tags: Saudi Arabia | UN | index | Denmark | Happiness |

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