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Ford’s new seat belts win technology award

Dubai, October 22, 2011

Ford Motors’ industry-first rear inflatable seat belts have been named a Breakthrough Product Award winner by Popular Mechanics, part of the magazine’s seventh annual Breakthrough Awards.

Lead developer Srini Sundararajan recently accepted the prestigious honor at a ceremony in New York City. The development of the technology was a team effort, Sundararajan said, and he’s proud that effort is being recognized.

“Ford’s goal is to develop innovative safety technologies that give our customers more peace of mind, so it is a great honor to receive the Breakthrough Technology Award,” said Sundararajan, safety technical leader for Ford Research and Innovation.

“I thank Popular Mechanics for recognizing the contributions of a number of dedicated engineers from Ford.”

The rear inflatable seat belts are designed to provide additional protection for rear seat occupants. They combine the attributes of traditional seat belts and airbags to help provide an added level of crash safety protection for rear seat occupants.

The advanced restraint system is designed to help reduce head, neck and chest injuries for rear seat passengers, often children and older passengers who can be more vulnerable to such injuries.

Ford introduced the inflatable rear seat belts in the all-new Explorer, bolstering the Explorer’s already extensive suite of safety innovations. The vehicle, which also made its regional debut at the Gitex Technology Week last week as Official Car of the Show, already has seen strong demand from customers for its safety and driver-assist technologies.

Early data showed approximately 40 per cent of Explorer buyers are parents who are ordering the rear inflatable belts, according to a report.

The rear inflatable seat belt technology will be introduced in more vehicles globally. – TradeArabia News Service




Tags: Dubai | Award | Seat belts | Ford motors | Popular Mechanics |

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